Prime has Stamped Their Name on the Rock World

I don’t like work, work is for jerks, stay in be with the circus freaks.”
-Prime, “In Summer”

Lee Heir was working in a meat factory. This isn’t a follow up to Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle. It was his first job and he wasn’t undercover. He was just going through the tedious motions of industrial livelihood, watching each package convey by with “prime” stamped on the side.

Whether the band name serves as motivation or a memory, Heir dedicated his free time to producing a blend of good music

“Too many people have nothing to do, don’t look at me, I’m not looking at you.”

Heir started Prime years ago, but later teamed up with guitarist Chris D. Bramley in 2019, and the two eventually brought in Stuart Boles and Jon Carter. Yet, the group was strictly formed to make music for the time being.

“I formed Prime originally in 2014 as a studio project,” Heir explained, “and in 2015 we began doing more live shows, playing pretty much continuously for a few years until I wrapped things up on the band just over a year ago, and decided we wouldn’t play live again.”

That decision happened in December 2019. It wasn’t the end of a band per se, but more of a recharge considering the group is still releasing music. The pandemic may have helped the quartet accept the transition to making camp in the studio and taking a break from touring. Heir was able to concentrate on new music and new projects while also returning to the drudge of the daily grind during the day.

And, as expected, new material was released.

“I’ve never been the strongest, but nobody knows this, I’ve never stayed the longest, nothing comes easy.”

Prime is a rock band. However, they blend in some classic sounds of other genres, and they do it well.

Heir said, “We make rock music, but it has a mix of blues, glam, indie and punk which I think makes us stand out.”

There are certain tracks where listeners are privy to the influences and inspirations of Prime, and the sound spans musical generations. There are hints of famed revolutionary artists such as David Bowie and even a little Pet Shop Boys sneak in, but what is most prominent is a mesh of ‘70s’ and ‘80s’ punk attitude and sound, bluesy rhythms and a touch of glam.

Although Prime may be finished touring and Heir is looking toward the future, there are still some quality tracks that listeners can enjoy.

“He would tell you, well he would tell you, it’s safe to cross the line.”

The UK outfit has centered their sound around influence and are looking to share their music with listeners though the direction of the band is still in question.

In 2020, they released a compilation of their best songs, Art/Facts. “In Summer” is a solid opening track with a genuine poppy ‘80s’ feel to the sound. The rhythm, especially the vocal verses, is infectious. It’s a perfect lead into “Bye Bye” which can be considered a glam rock, funky track that makes a listener want to move. From the first two songs, perhaps their best two tracks, audiences can grasp the talent Prime has for melody.

“To Be Or Not To Be” then brings out the punk sound. That continuous loud drumbeat that became a staple in the British punk revolution is found throughout, and Heir’s attitude can be sensed in his blunt lyrics. “I.O.U.” then highlights a different instrument: the bass. A funky bass line opens another rhythmic track that has a feel of an early Tom Petty or John Mellencamp song.

After the rough garage distortion of “No Sign Of Life,” the band slows down their tempo for the ever-important album balance. “Free N’ Easy” showcases Heir’s vocal range as the listener enjoys ‘70s’ melody and cadence. “Like The Weather” then teases listeners with a new element to Prime’s sound with a brief bit of synth to introduce the track—which will become more apparent later on.

“Flatline” showcases Heir’s real lyrics the best since he does tend to focus on what he observes on a day-to-day basis. It’s a great song because of the shift in tempo that happens around the 1:10 mark and the 2:00 mark on the track. As stressed before, and album needs balance, but that same balance can also be captured within the a single song if done correctly.

Considering Prime meshes styles of the past, most can be found in “Take Me To Your Crew” which is quite a feat to accomplish. There’s this strange marriage of ‘70s’ and ‘80s’ punk with a bluesy guitar solo by Bramley. Though punk is technically one genre, we’ve seen it change each decade, so being able to blend certain elements without losing the overall sound is respectable—as is adding a totally different genre’s dynamic.

Prime’s sound begins to shift into experimentation with “White Boys, White Noise,” taking a Primus-like bass line and inserting pop culture references. It’s funky, going back to their style on “Bye Bye,” but more contemporary. Fittingly, a “Bye Bye” remix follows with an increased tempo and electronica dynamics added, putting a new wave feel into what originally sounded like a ‘70s’ track. This remix takes basically everything they know how to do, punk, rock, funk, disco, glam, and whatever else to create this alternative track—and the keyboard is a fantastic touch.

“Teen TV” ends the album with a straight chaotic punk track, reverting back to that garage band sound of a band’s pure joy for their craft without a care for what the audience thinks.

In 2021, Prime released “Jeff Took A Trip,” which, despite the band’s uncertain future, verified their studio work remains intact. The psychedelic track rivals a Pink Floyd song with soul, blues, indie rock and electronica elements.

Heir confessed, “I’m not a fake songwriter. Everything is based in reality or observations that I feel to be an accurate representation of how people really act. There’s pressure I put on myself to succeed in what I do.”

There’s definitely talent present. If Heir continues Prime or decides to focus on a different project, he has at least left some good music to be remembered, and enough of a sample for listeners to be intrigued by what else is to come.

Tracks 1-5

We’re here: the top five songs from my top 100 playlist. I’m sorry you had to sit through some songs, maybe most of them, that you didn’t like or never planned to hear again, and that may not change with these next five. My favorite song of all time will probably never be on anyone else’s entire list, but again, it’s based on individual preference.

I do hope you choose to do your own top 100 playlist. It’s a great distraction during this crazy time in history, plus you may surprise yourself.

First, a recap. If you don’t remember or you’re just now tuning in, you can click on 21-25, 16-20, 11-15 and 6-10.

Now, enjoy my top five songs of all time.

5. “Wasted Years” by Cold

Favorite Lyric: “Was it life I betrayed, for the shape that I’m in, it’s not hard to fail, it’s not easy to win.”

There were four bands from this era that were my favorite: Oleander, Disturbed, Zebrahead (Justin Mauriello days) and Cold. Cold is a band that music lovers tend to either love or hate, and I fall at the top of the former. Just like with story songs, I’m a sucker for depressing songs, whether about heartbreak or life—but probably more of the latter. “Wasted Years” is that track for me, though Cold has a plethora of choices if someone is in need of a sad song. It’s one of the best songs off maybe the best post-grunge album I’ve ever heard, Year of the Spider. The song, like many of Scooter Ward’s, helped me reminisce, relate and recover in a mere four minute span, and any track that can have that type of emotional impact is something incredible.

4. “Teenage Anarchist” by Against Me!

Favorite Lyric: “I was a teenage anarchist, but the politics were too convenient.”

Against Me! is another great punk band. The Florida outfit has been around since 1997, and they have grown and transitioned to one of the more followed acts in the punk rock world. I used the word transitioned for a reason, because in 2012, lead singer Thomas James Gabel became Laura Jane Grace. Even though the band has seen a slew of members come and go, they have provided fans with some great tracks, none more meaningful than “Teenage Anarchist.” The song isn’t necessarily about what the title implies, but rather how the punk revolution left many young rebels unfulfilled. Essentially, the revolution never came on individual levels, but the memories of the time remained. This video also is chilling, especially with what has been going on in the world, and as one of the comments points out, the punk camaraderie around 1:40 is special in a non-conformist way. You put effort into your mindset as a youth, and sometimes that ideology doesn’t pan out, but the memories make the moments worth it.

3. “Piano Man” by Billy Joel

Favorite Lyric: “Yes, they’re sharing a drink they call loneliness, but it’s better than drinking alone.”

Billy Joel is one of my favorite artists of all time, and “Piano Man” could be the perfect song. The great instrumental melody, the lyrical rhythm, the mass appeal and, of course, the story and the techniques used to tell it. Joel was able to not only talk about an evening in a lounge and the collective characters that regularly grace the establishment, but rather the varying representations of people in society—and how they can agree upon one thing: music. Also, the “oh, la la la, di da da” bridge is fitting because it’s not necessarily about the story, but rather the same old story. I’m currently learning the song on the piano, and the jazzy elements Joel adds makes its C Major 3-4 signature far from basic. A goal of mine is to see Joel at Madison Square Garden, and I heard the audience gets to sing the chorus to “Piano Man.”

2. “Stand By Me” by Ben E. King

Favorite Lyric: “Stand by me.”

This is my favorite song from the era, and that may be true for many listeners. “Stand By Me” has been a staple in not only American culture, but the world, since its 1961 release. Ben E. King’s vocals have been used when people are in need of a positive message or to honor a memory, movies or television programs need an emotional moment, companies are in need of an accompaniment for an ad, or other artists need a great cover song. Artists such as John Lennon and Tracy Chapman have recorded the track. The song contains a basic rhythm with a basic, but immensely important message, and this shows that music doesn’t need to be complex to have a massive impact. In a world that is constantly changing, and heading more and more toward division rather than progression, we need tracks like “Stand By Me” to settle our communal anxiety and uncertainty. Now, if we could just stand by each other, that would be nice, as well.

1. “Stay Young” by Strata

Favorite Lyric: “For a lifetime of paying dues and ruthless reviews, yeah, it’s hard not to end up a cynic, when everyone’s too scared to walk in your shoes, but can work up the nevre to be critics.”    

Let the comments begin. “Stay Young” may not be on a lot of top 100 lists; in fact, many general music listeners may not have ever heard the track or have never explored Strata’s version of alt metal and rock. And though it may not be the best song ever, I believe everyone should hear it at least once. Lyrically, it’s a masterpiece, and musically, it’s just as outstanding because of the growing shift in tempo and tone. The main reason this song is so important is because of the message. This world is messed up, and it continues to become more complex, and it seems the only end game, whether sooner or later, is doomsday. We must look back on our lives, embrace the moments when we were young and innocent before being exposed to the troubles of reality, and perhaps the answers to happiness lie within those moments (I’m not telling you to live in the past, though). The line, “Can you still remember your very first kiss,” can be furthered into a deeper relation to confusion. We all remember our first kiss, and perhaps how confusing it was, and how vibrant the action and the dreams to follow became. Now we deal with the confusion of real life and the hopes that fade. We need to stay young, not just with the memories of when we were youths, but to prepare our minds for the future.

Thanks for listening! Now go out and make your own list and enjoy your favorite songs of all time.        

Tracks 6-10

You’ve made it to the top ten, skipping over songs you thought were lame and revisiting classics you love. If you’ve already forgotten, tracks 21-25 are here, 16-20 here and 11-15 here. We’ve listened to classical, folk, pop, punk, singer-songwriters, swing and rock. This next grouping requires some spare time as a fair warning.

Here are songs 6-10.

10. “Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, Op. 125” by Ludwig van Beethoven.

Favorite Lyric: N/A

Arguably the best symphony of all time, this was Ludwig van Beethoven’s last complete symphony, and he was almost deaf when he composed it. This work is an amazing achievement and will go down in history as one of the finest compositions in music across all genres. Again, though, classical music is the greatest and purest genre, making this symphony quite possibly the best piece of music every written. Around 17 and half minutes in, my favorite part of the choral masterpiece, molto vivace – presto, is performed for a good 13-some minutes. The intensity and transition of tempo is emotional and intoxicating, and the main portion of that movement can stay in my head all day. This is the work of a genius mind.

9. “Lightning Crashes” by Live

Favorite Lyric: “The angel opens her eyes, pale blue colored iris, presents the circle, and puts the glory out to hide.”

Despite the world’s admiration for Elton John’s Disney monster hit, “Lightning Crashes” is the better circle-of-life song. The basic 4-4 C-major riffs and rhythm complement the poetic story of a woman dying and another life being born. Death and life: it’s that simple. There is a misconception that a woman dies while giving birth, but the death and new life are two separate instances. This song is off one of the best rock albums of the ‘90s, Throwing Copper, and the growing shift in dynamics, a staple of Live, throughout makes this a very powerful track off a very significant album. Like death and life, “Lightning Crashes” is lasting.

8. “Runaround Sue” by Dion

Favorite Lyric: “Yeah, I should have known it from the very start, this girl will leave me with a broken heart.

My second favorite doo-wop song by possibly my favorite voice of the era. Not just because of Dion’s great range, but because of what he sang about. Guys, “Runaround Sue” is still relatable today; we’ve all experienced at least one hussy in our life. It’s more than that, though, because both sexes can relate to a disloyal lover, and how we must learn from our experiences and avoid future heartbreak created by betrayal. Plus, that beat and rhythm throughout can help you forget about your particular “Sue.” On another note, from the video, crowds were way less into concerts then, especially when Dion’s killing it.

7. “I’d Do Anything For Love (But I Won’t Do That)” by Meat Loaf

Favorite Lyric: “Some day I just pray to the god of sex and drugms and rock ‘n’ roll.”

I thoroughly enjoy “Bohemian Rhapsody,” but I have to give the edge to “I’d Do Anything For Love (But I Won’t Do That)” as the most epic operatic rock ballad. Including the most famously “cryptic” lyric in rock music, this dramatic song and the theatrical video is brilliant in all aspects of composition. The structure of the song deserves admiration. The instrumental introduction lasts two minutes, then softens to Meat Loaf’s presentation of the title and chorus. The volume and melody gradually increases, and instrumentals follow the verses and chorus, along with backing vocals, and nine and a half minutes into the song (album version), a duet with Lorraine Crosby finally sums up what Meat Loaf won’t do: move on (essentially). There are other things he won’t do, however: forget the way his partner feels, forgive himself if they don’t go all the way, do it better than he does it with her and stop dreaming of her. If you wanted to know, it’s always been in the song.

6. “Prisoner of Society” by The Living End

Favorite Lyric: “Cos I’m a brat, and I know everything, and I talk back, cos I’m not listening, to anything you say.”

Let’s hear it for some Australian punk! This song plays an important role in any late-90’s teenager’s life. During your adolescent angst, your mind is ripe to discover curiosity, especially considering the way society functions—wrongfully functions, at that. The Living End was also different in a sense because mainstream punk at that time was more poppy, or “bubblegum,” and the Australian trio seemed more in tune with the attitude and sound of when the British punk revolution was prominent in the ’70s. However, they also took advantage of the short-lived rockabilly craze of the ‘90s—the Stray Cats playing a major influence in their style, most noticeably in Scott Owen’s use of the double bass. I was at the perfect age when this song came out, and I’m thankful for that.

Next Post: Songs 1-5.

Tracks 11-15

If you’ve been following, songs 16-20 started to vary from songs 21-25, and that trend is about to continue. This playlist isn’t intended to boast my tastes, but rather remind listeners and readers of tracks they have forgotten about or perhaps introduce genres and songs they would generally overlook. There’s a lot of music in the world, and I’m open to the preferences and suggestions of others. This is my list, though, so you’re stuck with these tracks for now.

Here are songs 11-15.

15. “The Mice, The Demons, And The Piggies” by Wolfgang Parker

Favorite Lyric: “Well the whiskey in front of my face keeps pour-pour-pour-pour-pouring along, makes me drunk-drunk-drunk-drunk as hell all night long.”

You won’t find much information on Wolfgang Parker, but the Ohio-based musician and writer is incredibly talented and versatile. Room Nineteen is a fantastic album showcasing Parker’s abilities in punk, rock and swing. “The Mice, The Demons, And The Piggies” contains a basic and contagious rhythm, and the piano solo mid-way transitions perfectly into the more up-tempo concluding movement. The lyrics fit the sound, and if I would have to guess, the room is the character’s mind, and the taps and voices are inner demons he’s trying to wash away with a vice—the very vice that is the cause and solution. Just a guess. Or it could just be a really cool song. On another note, Parker is also a children’s book author

14. “Joey” by Concrete Blonde

Favorite Lyric: “But if I seem to be confused, I didn’t mean to be with you, and when you said I scared you, well I guess you scared me too.”

“Joey” is about alcoholism, or addiction in general, and not just the struggle the individual faces, but the people in their life who are forced to share the pain and absorb the consequences. Johnette Napolitano has said that this was a very difficult and painful song to write because of the content and close connection she has with the lyrics. Yet, we all have a connection to addiction in a way. I’ve lost friends to alcoholism, seen futures destroyed by drugs and others I know have lost family members. Though “Joey” charted after being released, the message behind the great lyrical and musical rhythm also contributed to the song’s impact on audiences.

13. “The Way That It Seems” by Onward, Etc.

Favorite Lyric: “The more I live life in reality, I pray to go insane, if your eyes are always open it’s impossible to dream.”

This song is a great journey song about perseverance and viewing the world in a different way than it’s presented on the surface. Rosco Wuestewald is an incredibly talented singer-songwriter, but his journey is one of innovation. His home has become the road; he started touring at 17, playing with local musicians in the towns where he booked gigs. After seeing Onward, Etc. (now Aage Birch) live on a whim, I was an immediate fan, and Wuestewald’s energetic form of folk and Americana combines a great sound with poetic stories and thought. “The Way That It Seems” is a song that can last a life-long journey.

12. “I Still Believe” by Frank Turner

Favorite Lyric: “And I still believe in the need, for guitars and drums and desperate poetry.”

Frank Turner is another artist I saw on a whim, and he has since become one of my favorite singer-songwriters of all time. He’s an amazing storyteller, and backed by the Sleeping Souls, his style and words reach a broad audience. He doesn’t just offer events from his life, but a relation for many people to ponder through brilliant rhythmic scheming. “I Still Believe” may not even be Turner’s best track, but it’s the song that introduced me to his music, but also an anthem for the genre I’ve loved for so many years. In my opinion, he will go down as one of the great singer-songwriters the world has had the privilege to experience. In a strange way, this song and video always gives me chills.

11. “Fast Car” by Tracy Chapman

Favorite Lyric: “You gotta make a decision, leave tonight or live and die this way.”

At some point in our life, we all feel stuck. Some people’s situations are much worse than others, and they’re constantly searching for an escape, a better life. Tracy Chapman tells a story about getting out and releasing the chains that hold someone down from being something else. A person can become stuck in a loop, and for many less fortunate it’s a difficult cycle to escape. “Fast Car” is an incredible song, and shouldn’t just be considered one of the best folk rock songs in history, but one of the best songs in history across all genres because of the perfect match of melody and message.

Next Post: Songs 6-10.

Tracks 16-20

The first five in my ranking didn’t vary far from a certain era, but as explained in the previous post, an individual’s tastes are shaped during a certain phase, and they may expand beyond that time, but it’s still a point in their life they can always revert back to. It’s their “remember when” era—which is a very vital time in development.

If you need a recap, click here. If not, let’s move on to songs 16-20.

20. “The Sound of Silence” by Simon & Garfunkel

Favorite Lyric: “And in the naked light I saw, ten thousand people, maybe more, people talking without speaking, people hearing without listening.”

“The Sound of Silence” is one of the most relevant songs in history that has lasted from generation to generation. That’s incredible from a musical standpoint, but not so much when considering the message. As Paul Simon struggles for meaning in an unforgiving society, he unravels the many layers of lonely thought. We’re even more isolated now, society is getting harsher and people are feeling a stronger sense of emptiness. And as the lyric states above, people are still talking without speaking and hearing without listening. Perhaps it would be wise to view this song as a relation rather than accepting it as a constant—though, it remains a song that is needed on many levels.

19. “Qi” by Phildel

Favorite Lyric: N/A

Through my years of playing classical and ragtime piano, and the brilliant pieces I’ve heard and the rest of the world knows, this short work is one of the most beautiful piano solos I’ve come across. So much so, that I learned to play it myself. The key signature changes from Bb major to A major and so on, and in the second part of the movement, the composer subtly adds extra notes to enhance the piece as it moves along. Phildel is a talented and versatile British artist who can create pop tracks as well as compose neoclassical pieces that don’t need lyrics to move listeners. Classical music is so pure, and the best works ignite emotions without saying a word.

18. “Shed Some Light” by Shinedown

Favorite Lyric: “It’s innocence within the maze, but I have chosen the wrong way, I’m still getting over who I was, there’s no sense of trust, there’s no definition of love.”

Shinedown, like Seether, has been one of the best rock bands the last two decades, and they take time producing quality and balanced albums. Musically, they’re incredibly talented, and Brent Smith not only has one of the most powerful set of vocal chords on a lead singer in this era, he may be one of the best vocalists in the genre’s history—and that is saying A LOT. “Shed Some Light” is off Shinedown’s second studio album, Us and Them, and has always been a moving track about self-discovery, and a listener can find a relation to the words no matter which phase of life.

17.“Runaway Train” by Soul Asylum

Favorite lyric: “Bought a ticket for a runaway train, like a madman laughin’ at the rain, little out of touch, little insane, just easier than dealing with the pain.”

This famous power ballad is about depression, but Soul Asylum’s video also links the song to missing children and teens—which is also depressing. There’s a sense of emptiness and unanswered questions with both topics, and an urge for people to establish a connection for stability and survival. I have listened to “Runaway Train” many times in my life, and the emotions and message never stray, and for a song to continue to have such a lasting impact, not just on a personal level, but in the music world as well, is quite impressive.

16. “Use Me” by Bill Withers

Favorite Lyric: “You just keep on using me, until you use me up.”

Bill Withers is a legend, and the world lost him this year, unfortunately. “Use Me” is my favorite from his collection, though his career left listeners with amazing hits. His soulful voice is on full display here, especially when he repeats “baby” as if trying to convince himself the relationship will get better while masking the truth. However, the most infectious part of the song is the famous rhythm throughout. It’s simply cool, and if you’re driving with your windows down and this song is blaring, other people think you’re cool—or should at least.

Next Post: Songs 11-15.

Tracks 21-25

As many are aware, we have some spare time on our hands. When the COVID-19 pandemic forced most to stay inside, I started my own music challenge: constructing a playlist of the 100 best songs I have ever heard. The running time for the arrangement is just over seven hours—so, a workday. Feel free to partake in the challenge, and give yourself the gift of songs you wouldn’t skip to get through the day—or if you end up stranded on an island.

The key component to such a playlist is the individual’s ears, not what one is told to like or the masses have deemed amazing. With that being said, a song’s immense popularity has been taken into consideration.

Other factors included the best lyrics and rhythms as they relate to the person, and also the overall societal message shared or emotion ignited within an individual. No genre was excluded, and some of my favorite artists, ones in which I own their entire catalog, didn’t make the cut. It was surprising, it was difficult and I have a separate spillover list because nothing is concrete.

With that in mind, and the aforementioned spare time, I would like to share with you the top 25 songs I have ever heard in increments of five rankings.

DISCLAIMER: If you’re expecting Queen, The Rolling Stones, Charlie, Chuck, Claude, Elton, Ms. Gaynor or Mungo Jerry, then you can find the entire list here.

Without further ado, here are songs 21-25.

25. “Walkin’ On The Sun” by Smash Mouth

Favorite Lyric: “Twenty-five years ago, they spoke out and they broke out, of recession and oppression and together they toked, and they folked out with guitars around a bonfire, just singin’ and clappin’, man, what the hell happened.”

Okay, I know what you’re thinking, and yes, you’ve committed yourself to an eclectic list. Before Smash Mouth became major mainstream all-stars, their 1997 debut single was widely accepted in the U.S. and internationally. “Walkin’ On The Sun” discusses racial and social issues from the past, popularized a reinvention of psychedelic funk by blending it with pop rock, and you have to love that late-90’s fashion. Also, the video served as a generational musical connection and linked many Gen-Y teens to their parents’ past attitudes and tastes.

24. “Ghost” by House of Heroes

Favorite Lyric: “I’m gonna fade away, drifting out of your life, I wanna fade away, through the empty night.”

I’m a sucker for great stories, and wish a video was made for this song. Tim Skipper’s gentle timbre sets the tone for this track, and though the guitar pitch is one of happiness, the story immerses the listener into the character’s life and the additional consequences suffered from a bad decision. “Ghost” is a beautiful song, and the band’s harmony about fading away at the end—while fading away at the end—is structurally brilliant.

23. “Sympathetic” by Seether

Favorite Lyric: “And my words will be here when I’m gone.”

Seether has been one of the better post-grunge rock acts of the last two decades. The South African outfit has been recognized with double-digit awards and hit after hit, and actually have the most songs by one artist on this top-100 list—which even surprised me with the library I have. Seether’s 2002 debut album, Disclaimer, was fantastic from the first to last track, headlined by three singles, “Sympathetic” not being one. Yet, the lyrics resonated the most with me, and the cadence of Shaun Morgan’s voice has been a staple of their success in the rock world. Consistent good lyrical rhythm is difficult to come by in the genre.

22. “I Walk Alone” by Oleander

Favorite Lyric: “I can’t take this any longer, I won’t heal until I’m stronger, strong enough to not be afraid, of what anybody thinks, of what anybody says, about the way, about the way I am.”

Generally, music tastes are formed in the midst of teenage angst and discovery. Of course, they evolve over time through different phases of life, but if you’re in dire need of a memory, you can always go back to the scene when you we’re transitioning into an adult—or at least when you thought you were mature enough. Oleander is the alternative band from that era I admire the most, and still have never heard a song I didn’t enjoy by the Sacramento rockers. “I Walk Alone” helped calm a sporadic mind, and Thomas Flowers’ words, though “alone” is in the title, showed many lost souls that they weren’t actually alone.

21. “Talk About You” by Mika

Favorite Lyric: “Walk through the city like stupid people do, a million faces, but all I’m seeing is you.”

Mika is one of the most successful pop stars in the world. He has won 20 awards and been nominated for about 60 more. He’s just not that well-known in the U.S. He’s by far my favorite guilty pleasure in music. “Talk About You” is a song that is hard to get out of your head, and that’s what great singer-songwriters do: they write addictive records. The Lebanese-born artist has a knack for creating pop and glam rock tracks that are full of colorful expression, pride and rhythm. It’s hard not to move to Mika; it’s hard not to become addicted.

Next post: Songs 16-20.