The Last Element is Undoubtedly Dynamic

“I hear your voice, it’s calling out my name, I had no choice, I watched you slip away from me.”
-The Last Element, “My Heart Became Your Home”

No matter the genre, a general love for music is vital for success. Achievement, however, is relative, and when a group can come together and exert the same passion as the next member, it will show in their final product. The men in The Last Element have exemplified their desire for music.

“I call it home again because my heart has been exposed.”

The alternative quintet formed in Amsterdam in 2016. Each member of The Last Element had experience in the rock world, touring and playing shows with other acts. With the combination of industry knowledge and musical love, the group banded together to form their own signature sound, and has created an organic following while doing it independently.

Guitarist Nick Polman simply stated, “The love for music is what brought us together.”

That dedication is surprisingly difficult to sustain in the music world because of false expectation and immaturity. The Last Element is made up of vocalist Jasper Roelofsen, guitarists Noah Grim and Polman, bassist Jan Bijlsma and drummer Robert Spaninks. The five have committed to making better music no matter where it takes them, which is refreshing.

“It’s not exactly about the prospect of being able to retire to your own private island in the Pacific for any band making modern metal these days. Few are able to make a living from it. But hey, you’re a musician and you have this terribly romantic idea of being in a band, touring and playing to audiences around the globe. Unless you gave it a proper try and pushed aside everything to where you want to be, you’re not entitled to give up.”

Not only does devotion advance an artist, so does honesty. That doesn’t mean The Last Element are content, though. They’re learning and growing tremendously.

“I created my own hell, I hate it, but I’m still stayin’.

With an endless supply of influence, The Last Element has definitely found a place in the modern rock and metal world. As discussed in previous articles, acts are currently revisiting the roots of modern metal and the emo-alternative scene of the early-2000s—which span the greater part of this century’s first decade. It’s a fantastic era of rock and metal, and The Last Element is pulling from the time but keeping their sound unique and fresh.

One of the major features the band uses is soundscapes. There’s synth, and then there’s fitting synth appropriately with the aura and emotions of a track. The Last Element is able to master this technique with each song which is impressive.

Polman explained, “We all have certain preferences or elements we’d like to hear back in our songs and, of course, along with that boundary, also shift towards what’s current these days. We feel that we are stronger when we’re together and click like pieces of a puzzle forming the bigger picture.”

On first listen, especially with their latest release, there are notes of Nonpoint and Taproot. There are other influences present, such as Breaking Benjamin and Anberlin. If I may go a little hipster here, I believe The Chuck Shaffer Picture Show is present as well. The Last Element is able to mix fast-paced distortion with backing synth and a combination of vocal tone and tempo. For listeners outside of the genre, screaming can be quite eloquent if done correctly.  

The Last Element doesn’t drift from their sound; they know what they have and don’t need to be entirely experimental. Sometimes changing a genre isn’t a good thing and it leads to the delusional confidence in the ability of an artist, which eventually hinders their progression. This band, however, is dedicated to the process and their craft.

With normal approaching, or whatever normal may become, The Last Element is excited to share their music live. In the meantime, they have been perfecting their sound, almost obsessively, and they have remained consistent. The proof? Having over a million streams. Not bad.

“Now you follow me just to watch me bleed.”

The Last Element has released a slew of singles the last five years. In 2016, they debuted with the song “Broken.” This track right away shows their modern rock and alternative roots. Though the structure is slightly choppy during transitions, it’s a solid song. The same year, they put out “Lost” and their sound begins to develop. They still have the heavy riffs and drumbeat, but the synth is more apparent at the beginning and Roelofsen’s transitions flow better. It also displays the band’s rhythmic ability.

The following year, the band released four more tracks. “Gravity” brings in that emo element and listeners can hear the structural progression. The composition changes; there seems to be more theory involved with how chords are broken up and arpeggios are used. “Dreamweavers” adds another shift in cadence and vocal tone. Roelofsen begins to show his range and utilize different elements of his voice throughout the song. Then with “Hollow” we have what is always needed: balance. Musically, the band shows they are capable of capturing a mood, especially during the intro which also is used in stages of the verse. It’s not a soft, acoustic track, but the sound meshes with the lyrics and emotion well. “My Heart Became Your Home” is the song of 2017 for the band, and is one of their best to date. Ballads always catch the attention of listeners, and this song fits in with some of the best painful emo love-themed songs on the radio.

In 2018, the band only released one song, “Not All Said and Done,” and it was a tad underwhelming, but not because it’s a bad track. If anything, it’s crisper in production, but it didn’t seem to advance the band’s sound. The first two years there was obvious progression.

Then, in 2019, The Last Element wrote their best song. Right from the beginning of “My Own Hell,” it was a hit, and there is no doubt about it. When a rock song is that loud, that rhythmic and that catchy, both musically and lyrically, a listener knows within in seconds. “Forget About The Sun” and “Damaged” both show how hard the band worked on perfecting the theoretical and structural parts of composition. Everything is smoother, everything blends well.

Last year, the band released four tracks. “Stuck In My Head” and “Ocean Floor” are continuations of their 2017 emo sound and then “Blood Diamond” and “The Devil” goes back a little further with their more powerful riffs, bass and drums. However, just like they band has proven they can evolve, Roelofsen’s lyrics similarly grow, becoming deeper and more complex. This is what good bands do.

The Last Element’s latest release, “Cut It Off” debuted this year. If we track back their progression, or their evolution, if you will, this track can be considered a final draft. It’s a solid rock song that can be on the radio and was composed by a very seasoned band. The vocal bridge could remind rockers of “Runaway Train” by Oleander—which is good a thing—except The Last Element truly comes into their own emotions and sound. It will only get better for the band from here.

Polman and the band view their music as they do life. “It’s an ongoing process that will only stop as soon as you take your final breath, a process you try to get a grip on and if you take the occasion to learn from all that you encounter, the journey through life can be an adventurous and rich experience. If you are granted the time, do something good with it, tomorrow may never come.”

The Last Element has developed a great sound the right way. They have songs that should be on the radio now, and they’re an act that will be touring and making music for a long time.

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