Dig Two Graves has Surfaced

“Your heart is my candlestick, when it lights it takes everything I have.”
Dig Two Graves, “Wick”

Dig Two Graves doesn’t want to be labeled—how very Sturgill Simpson of them. Being labeled conforms an act, especially in over-saturated genres. Through defining a trait that preaches uniqueness, the band attempts to just make music how they want to make music.

“I won’t let you win, you’ll never be set free.”

Dig Two Graves formed in New Jersey. Guitarist Josh Brewer and drummer Kenny Meeks have been playing music together for as long as they can remember. Vocalist Mike Reisser joined the band after befriending Brewer in college, and bassist Jess Agins was discovered on Instagram. Ah, the power of social networking.

After just a few years, the band created enough anticipation for their debut release. Perhaps their attitude fits the scene well and younger audiences have grasped onto the carefree disregard toward industry and the confidence that comes with such brashness. Dig Two Graves fits the scene they are trying not to be a part of.

“Genres are a social construct made by FDR and the communists,” Brewer stated. “We’re free flowin’ and play whatever we want.”

The combination of metal and orchestra has worked on many levels before. Melancholy lyrics, which are sometimes too difficult to understand due to raspy screaming, pair well with minor scales and the somber shrill of other string instruments. Perfecting the blend, however, must be accomplished through a focused structure.

“My thoughts and skeletons are strangling me.”

The quartet does, in fact, possess a unique style, and one that has been dormant in mainstream music for quite some time. Yet, just like most late-‘90’s, early-2000’s sounds, a resurgence is simmering. That doesn’t mean that Dig Two Graves hasn’t placed a progressive twist on the sound.

They have been described as metalcore, which is probably where most of their sound falls into place, but with the emergence of a plethora of sub-genres, they have expanded to broader niches. The band’s range is eclectic, from progressive metal to djent to dream pop. In other words, they like to experiment; and early in their career—especially during a pandemic—is probably the best time to explore what delineates them from other acts.

One thing that is impressive is Dig Two Graves has a broad range of influences, capturing versions of rock from other cultures. Brewer mentioned the Japanese acts Dir En Grey, Luna Sea and The Gazette as major influences, for example. However, they also pull inspiration from mainstream performers such as Fall Out Boy and Asking Alexandria.

Meeks explained, “We just make whatever we feel like. Our main goal is to make heavy music with pretty piano parts and cool orchestral stuff.”

This mix of aforementioned artists helps explain Dig Two Graves, but not necessarily their music. For the fans who need an example, perhaps the ones who are less hipster in who they listen to, Dig Two Graves has early Mudvayne written all over them—but without makeup all over them.

“Don’t sink with me, drowning eternally.”

Mudvayne’s 2000 release L.D. 50 was a fantastic introduction to the nu-metal outfit that challenged Slipknot early on as the best mainstream hardcore shock act. What’s going to decide the direction Dig Two Graves takes is Reisser’s vocals, and that comes with maturity.

Chad Gray is the voice of Mudvayne, and during the beginning that voice consisted of a lot of screaming. However, just as the band transitioned out of their huge makeup budget, their sound and vocals became more rhythmic and structured, which made their impact more powerful and lasting. The same could be said for Corey Taylor and the development of Slipknot. However, there is one thing that Brewer shares with both Gray and Taylor: an underrated singing voice overlooked by shattering tones. That’s how someone gets labeled when they don’t want to be labeled; some fans don’t look at the whole picture.

Gray proved he had an excellent voice right from the start on L.D.  50, and it became even more seasoned and used as an instrument as Mudvayne progressed. Taylor showed his range primarily with Stone Sour. Like it or not, critics, these guys are musicians with knowledge of the craft, and so are Dig Two Graves.

Dig Two Graves released their EP, Deathwish, in 2019. They introduce this alien-ish sci-fi synth sound to set the tone during “As Above.” The intro track is a tad choppy and lacks a direct tempo, but there is definitely potential and at least showcases the band’s creativity.

“Track 2” features those signature progressive metalcore guitar riffs. Around the 2:30 mark of the track, the listener experiences a simple twist. It’s not a necessarily a solo, but just an extended bridge bringing out the lead guitar notes that have been present throughout. There is also a hint of synth that never overpowers the song—which is nice.

That same harmonious background, a more passive beat, heightens “Wick” to what may be the band’s signature song. The track displays their control over their musical elements.

The title track off the EP captures what Dig Two Graves is going for. This is where the synth-metal combination comes through the most, as well as the testing with structure and where such experimental elements fall. Though it is unique and there’s a great pulsing drum, the flow that had been built up on the first three tracks begins to regress.

“Iron Lungs and Paper Hearts” contains those great spooky notes, and the listener can realize here that that’s what the band wants more of, but the heaviness of the rhythm still outweighs these great orchestral melodies.

If you want a song from Dig Two Graves to base their sound on, it’s “So Below.” This track, in my mind, exemplifies what they are going for musically the best. The dynamics are the most balanced in any song, the transition from strong riffs to melodious backings flow better, leading to an exceptional outro around five minutes into the song. These two-and-a-half minutes are perhaps the best moments of the album—and then it ends.

If I may revert back to my reference of L.D. 50. I’m not comparing Dig Two Graves to Mudvayne because they are two different bands. However, Mudvayne did use all these musical elements early in their career, and Gray combined screaming with a countertenor-esque shift which sometimes led to even spoken word. Reisser has a good voice; another nice reference could be Stephen Richards of Taproot. You can either go as far as to say he can hit the same notes as Conor Mason of Nothing But Thieves, one of the better vocalists in modern rock.

However, it’s all about how someone wishes to express their pain and how a band wishes to evolve their personal sound. Dig Two Graves has a lot of potential within a variety of sub-categories. Their composition and talent is there, they have a sound, but all artists should be wary of too much experimentation because it can impede clarity. Complexity can be captured, and with focus and inner-song structure, Dig Two Graves has the ability to do exactly that.

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