The Simple Radicals Share Their Passion and Energy

“I’ve got the rest of my life and I’m not gonna stop ‘til I get it right.”
-The Simple Radicals, “The Optimist”

Rock is a glorious genre. It’s diverse, it’s moving in many ways, and it captures the essence and passion of a person’s identity—whether that be artist or audience. This happens in all music, but a song leaves a certain impression to the point where you can hear a release from decades ago and remember the exact moment you heard that track and what it meant. The Simple Radicals attempt to bring back that feeling.

“Whatcha gonna do when your worlds collide?”

Vocalist John Malkin and guitarist John Griffin formed The Simple Radicals in Chicago. After years of performing with other acts and laying tracks in home studios, a simple request via social media brought the two together—and a sound was born.

It’s an old sound, but not borrowed, and the same could be said for the sake of a revolution. As discussed before, rock music is due for a rewind that will rejuvenate the genre back into mainstream significance. Not that all rockers necessarily value mainstream success, many would claim the underground is where the energy pulsates the most, but rather the ability to share a beloved sound and deeply meaningful lyrics. Or at least a strong opinion.

Malkin shared, “We released a song and video “Rich Man Wanna Be King” which provides a scathing lampoon of ex-President Trump. It’s already racked up 190,000 views and climbing.”

Impressive, yes, but The Simple Radicals are more than one message; they’re a package deal.

“Let’s take our time, and don’t ask when or don’t ask why.”

Inspiration can occasionally be misconstrued as imitation. Yet, all music comes from a similar foundation of past brilliance. With influences such as Pearl Jam, Foo Fighters, Cheap Trick, Pink Floyd, Green Day, and Tom Petty, The Simple Radicals have a tremendous base to build upon. These great names have helped the band craft their sound and style, and also fittingly place them in the retro-rock genre.

“I grew up listening to classic rock and still listen to it to this day,” Malkin said. “It’s timeless and some of the best music ever written. I wanted to form a band that maintained the integrity of the classic rock sound while adding retro flavors.”

The key element to The Simple Radicals’ sound is they actually span generations—which, and I’m aging myself here, have all become “classic” rock. As long as the loves of my adolescence aren’t considered “oldies” then I’m fine with the label. I remember when it happened; years ago, probably at least over a decade, a classic rock station in town played Local H. I knew how old I was then. Yet, just like a certain song, these moments are engrained in a listener’s memory, and they are welcomed.

Malkin explained where his lyrics stem from, “Life as we see and know it. When you distill it down to the basics and just take a look around, you’ll see that it’s so dynamic and malleable. Things develop and change right in front of your eyes every second. The challenging part is how to capture it all and put it into lyrics and music. But that’s also the most rewarding part.”

That’s what rock music is about, and life has certainly been challenging for all as of late. Even more reason for the revolution.

“Life is filled with unknown things, we search for direction, find out what it means.”

The Simple Radicals have taken advantage of the pandemic. The more we move through this, the more we are winning the battle. Progression remained essential for the band including the heavy promotion of their releases, recording new music and the development of a podcast, “Music & A Brew.” What more do you really need in life?

A sustainable income would be nice, and touring is where acts make a majority of their revenue. The Simple Radicals have played hometown festivals as well as iconic venues like New York City’s Cutting Room. Though 2020 came with many cancellations, the band is slated to support major acts and perform at SXSW in Austin, Texas in 2021. With the guests they are able to book on their podcast, and the artists they tour with, The Simple Radicals have created and maintained their experience in the industry.

“I’m always learning from other bands and musicians,” Malkin said. “The way they interact with the fans, their mannerisms, how they use pauses in the show. It’s a combination of the band being completely in sync and in the moment combined with the audience truly engaged with you and your music. There is nothing more rewarding than watching people lose themselves in your music. It’s intoxicating.”

Even though the live shows are scarce, we’re gradually crawling back to normal. As for now, The Simple Radicals are solidifying an online presence with their sound.

“Let me share an emotion with you.”

When a band has knowledge and experience in their genre, especially when it comes to blending the subtle differences each generation presents, it shows. From blues to classic rock to even hints of metal, The Simple Radicals have used their industry familiarity to produce new content the last two years.

In 2019, the band released an eight-track album, New Revolution. It was pure, direct and visceral. “Raise Hell” is a perfect opening track. The song not only preludes to the overall statement of the album, the structure and flow hit all the right elements you want when beginning a musical experience: a growing intro, crisp riffs and a catchy rhythm that transitions anticipation into energy.

“The Optimist” then comes in with a heavy metrical bassline and a solid beat throughout courtesy of James Page and Griff Johnson. Something that stands out other than just the standard rock vocals is the clean and blistering solos Griffin produces. The rock feel is there, but the influences are apparent and diverse from track to track, yet contained, which is important because it proves the band doesn’t lose their style via experimentation.

“Raise Hell” gave us a little of The Refreshments at the beginning, “Medicate” has hints of Alice Cooper, the title track is just a clean standard rock song straight from the ‘90s it would seem on first listen, and then they relax the tempo for “Emotion.” Balance is so important while producing a full album or listeners become weary of the tracks just blending together.

“Talk” is a beautiful enigma of meshing styles; it shouldn’t work, but it does, and has before any of the mentions to follow, which makes it stranger. Griffin’s notes are Santana- or Pink Floyd-esque, while Malkin captures the bleak somberness of ‘90’s vocals, but the undertones are comparable to ‘80’s metal. “Talk” is a three-decade experience of rock music shifts in about five minutes.

Then the transition out begins the conclusion. Malkin’s favorite song he has written sums up the overall message of New Revolution, and though the tempo is slow and basic, it proves that passion and energy truly have no specific cadence, just relevance and relation within. This technique was perfected by Metallica, and after listening to “Learn” you’re given that exact feeling.

“Civility” is great closure to the journey. If an album’s overall rhythm resembles a roller coaster, then a band has done a very good thing. Listeners are able to experience the variant moods Malkin and Griffin create from song to song and a collection of life experiences.

Malkin stated, “The important thing is to get things right in your life and you have your whole life to do so. Be patient but just get it right.”

The band is getting it done on many levels. On March 5, The Simple Radicals released a cover of Jefferson Airplane’s “White Rabbit” with a pop-psychedelic spin. The collaboration with Che-Val stretches even further back into rock history, and the new version is excellent.

The Simple Radicals may be strengthening their presence in the scene at the perfect time. Stay simple and think radical.  

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