Tracks 6-10

You’ve made it to the top ten, skipping over songs you thought were lame and revisiting classics you love. If you’ve already forgotten, tracks 21-25 are here, 16-20 here and 11-15 here. We’ve listened to classical, folk, pop, punk, singer-songwriters, swing and rock. This next grouping requires some spare time as a fair warning.

Here are songs 6-10.

10. “Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, Op. 125” by Ludwig van Beethoven.

Favorite Lyric: N/A

Arguably the best symphony of all time, this was Ludwig van Beethoven’s last complete symphony, and he was almost deaf when he composed it. This work is an amazing achievement and will go down in history as one of the finest compositions in music across all genres. Again, though, classical music is the greatest and purest genre, making this symphony quite possibly the best piece of music every written. Around 17 and half minutes in, my favorite part of the choral masterpiece, molto vivace – presto, is performed for a good 13-some minutes. The intensity and transition of tempo is emotional and intoxicating, and the main portion of that movement can stay in my head all day. This is the work of a genius mind.

9. “Lightning Crashes” by Live

Favorite Lyric: “The angel opens her eyes, pale blue colored iris, presents the circle, and puts the glory out to hide.”

Despite the world’s admiration for Elton John’s Disney monster hit, “Lightning Crashes” is the better circle-of-life song. The basic 4-4 C-major riffs and rhythm complement the poetic story of a woman dying and another life being born. Death and life: it’s that simple. There is a misconception that a woman dies while giving birth, but the death and new life are two separate instances. This song is off one of the best rock albums of the ‘90s, Throwing Copper, and the growing shift in dynamics, a staple of Live, throughout makes this a very powerful track off a very significant album. Like death and life, “Lightning Crashes” is lasting.

8. “Runaround Sue” by Dion

Favorite Lyric: “Yeah, I should have known it from the very start, this girl will leave me with a broken heart.

My second favorite doo-wop song by possibly my favorite voice of the era. Not just because of Dion’s great range, but because of what he sang about. Guys, “Runaround Sue” is still relatable today; we’ve all experienced at least one hussy in our life. It’s more than that, though, because both sexes can relate to a disloyal lover, and how we must learn from our experiences and avoid future heartbreak created by betrayal. Plus, that beat and rhythm throughout can help you forget about your particular “Sue.” On another note, from the video, crowds were way less into concerts then, especially when Dion’s killing it.

7. “I’d Do Anything For Love (But I Won’t Do That)” by Meat Loaf

Favorite Lyric: “Some day I just pray to the god of sex and drugms and rock ‘n’ roll.”

I thoroughly enjoy “Bohemian Rhapsody,” but I have to give the edge to “I’d Do Anything For Love (But I Won’t Do That)” as the most epic operatic rock ballad. Including the most famously “cryptic” lyric in rock music, this dramatic song and the theatrical video is brilliant in all aspects of composition. The structure of the song deserves admiration. The instrumental introduction lasts two minutes, then softens to Meat Loaf’s presentation of the title and chorus. The volume and melody gradually increases, and instrumentals follow the verses and chorus, along with backing vocals, and nine and a half minutes into the song (album version), a duet with Lorraine Crosby finally sums up what Meat Loaf won’t do: move on (essentially). There are other things he won’t do, however: forget the way his partner feels, forgive himself if they don’t go all the way, do it better than he does it with her and stop dreaming of her. If you wanted to know, it’s always been in the song.

6. “Prisoner of Society” by The Living End

Favorite Lyric: “Cos I’m a brat, and I know everything, and I talk back, cos I’m not listening, to anything you say.”

Let’s hear it for some Australian punk! This song plays an important role in any late-90’s teenager’s life. During your adolescent angst, your mind is ripe to discover curiosity, especially considering the way society functions—wrongfully functions, at that. The Living End was also different in a sense because mainstream punk at that time was more poppy, or “bubblegum,” and the Australian trio seemed more in tune with the attitude and sound of when the British punk revolution was prominent in the ’70s. However, they also took advantage of the short-lived rockabilly craze of the ‘90s—the Stray Cats playing a major influence in their style, most noticeably in Scott Owen’s use of the double bass. I was at the perfect age when this song came out, and I’m thankful for that.

Next Post: Songs 1-5.

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